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Deputy Minister of Public Security dismissed
Thursday,  8/9/2018, 14:58 

Deputy Minister of Public Security dismissed

The Saigon Times Daily

Bui Van Thanh (L) is relieved of his post as deputy minister of Public Security, while Tran Viet Tan (R) is stripped of his title as former deputy minister of Public Security for the 2011-2016 tenure – PHOTO: TL

HCMC – Bui Van Thanh has been relieved of his post as deputy minister of Public Security for committing serious violations among other shortcomings while on duty, Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc said in a statement on Wednesday.

The Government leader also stripped Tran Viet Tan of his title as the former deputy minister of Public Security for the 2011-2016 tenure in another statement issued the same day.

Both decisions took effect immediately.

The PM submitted a statement to State President Tran Dai Quang, asking him to demote the 60-year-old Thanh from the rank of lieutenant general to colonel, while the 63-year-old Tan was to be demoted from senior lieutenant general to lieutenant general.

Earlier, on July 28, Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong presided over a meeting of the Politburo and the Secretariat of the Party Central Committee to deliberate sanctions against Bui Van Thanh, Tran Viet Tan and another general. The disciplinary action came just one day after the Party Central Committee’s Inspection Commission proposed sanctions against Thanh.

In his capacity as a member of the Party Committee of the Ministry of Public Security and a deputy minister in charge of the ministry's General Department of Logistics and Engineering, Thanh was found guilty of several violations.

Thanh had infringed on the principles of democratic centralism, was negligent and had underperformed in leadership, management and oversight roles, leading to violations at the General Department of Logistics and Engineering.

He also broke rules on the protection of State secrets and the working regulations of the ministry. He signed several documents on behalf of the ministry, proposing sales of houses and defense land, in violation of prevailing regulations, and signed other documents beyond his authority.

It was Thanh who allowed Phan Van Anh Vu, aka Vu Nhom, to travel overseas, and suggested issuing a diplomatic passport for Vu, even though the individual was not eligible to hold this kind of document.

Vu Nhom, a former property magnate in Danang City, was arrested in Singapore early this year carrying two passports – one fake and one real – and was swiftly deported to Vietnam. At a one-day closed-door trial in Hanoi late last month, Vu Nhom was given a nine-year prison sentence for deliberately divulging State secrets, though officials have not detailed his crimes, citing national security.

Based on the Party’s rules, the Politburo stripped Thanh of all his Party posts and requested the Government to issue administrative sanctions against him and lower his rank.

Having considered an Inspection Commission proposal for disciplining Colonel General Tran Viet Tan, former member of the Executive Board of the Party Committee at the Ministry of Public Security and former deputy minister, the Politburo concluded that Tan was negligent; had underperformed in his leadership, management and oversight roles; and had signed several documents in violation of the rules on the protection of State secrets.

The Politburo then dismissed Tan from the Executive Board of the Party Committee at the ministry for the 2011-2016 tenure. It also asked the Government to issue administrative sanctions against him and lower his rank.

Thanh and Tan’s infringements led to serious consequences, tarnishing the prestige of the Party, the police force and themselves, as well as rousing public anger.

Thanh’s dismissal comes as the Government launches a major restructuring of the Ministry of Public Security, with dozens of departments to be scrapped in a bid to turn the sprawling ministry into a lean and effective machine, local media reported this week.

Vietnam’s vast police force – both uniformed and plainclothes – and parts of the cybersecurity and intelligence units fall under the ministry's umbrella, though staffing numbers have not been made public.

Earlier this year, several high-ranking ministry officers were arrested for running a massive online gambling ring, including the officials in charge of policing internet betting.

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